Today is World Diabetes Day. The day was created to the growing concerns that the threat diabetes has on our health.

What is diabetes?

Diabetes is a condition where the amount of glucose in your blood is too high because the body cannot use it properly. This is because your pancreas doesn’t produce any insulin, or not enough insulin, to help glucose enter your body’s cells – or the insulin that is produced does not work.

There are two main types of diabetes: Type 1 diabetes and Type 2 diabetes

Type 1

Type 1 diabetes develops when the insulin-producing cells in the body have been destroyed and the body is unable to produce any insulin.

Type 1 diabetes accounts for between 10 per cent of all adults with diabetes and is treated by daily insulin injections, a healthy diet and regular physical activity. Type 1 diabetes can develop at any age but usually appears before the age of 40, and especially in childhood. It is the most common type of diabetes found in childhood.

Type 2

Type 2 diabetes develops when the insulin-producing cells in the body are unable to produce enough insulin, or when the insulin that is produced does not work properly

Diabetes Symptoms

In Type 1 diabetes the signs and symptoms are usually very obvious and develop very quickly, typically over a few weeks. The symptoms are quickly relieved once the diabetes is treated and under control.

In Type 2 diabetes the signs and symptoms may not be so obvious, as the condition develops slowly over a period of years and may only be picked up in a routine medical check up. Symptoms are quickly relieved once diabetes is treated and under control.

The main symptoms of undiagnosed diabetes include:

  • passing urine more often than usual, especially at night
  • increased thirst
  • extreme tiredness
  • unexplained weight loss
  • genital itching or regular episodes of thrush
  • slow healing of cuts and wounds
  • blurred vision

It’s that time of year again, Bonfire Night! We are here to give you some useful tips on how to stay safe and also some advice on common injuries that can happen around this time of year.

Fireworks may be nice to watch but like anything they come with risks. Last year over 990 people required hospital treatment due to lack of knowledge on safety around fireworks.

Have fun, but also stay safe. Here are some useful tips for you:

Minor burns

A minor burn is red and painful and sometimes results in a blister – for instance when a child picks up an old sparkler that hasn’t cooled down.

  • Hold the affected area under cold, running water for at least 20 minutes. Remove any jewellery while you are cooling. Once it is cool cover the burn with a sterile dressing or clean, non-fluffy material to protect from infection. Kitchen film or a clean plastic bag make a good alternative dressing.
  • If the burn is larger than the palm of the casualty’s hand it will require medical attention.
  • Special care should be taken if the burn is on a young child or an elderly person.

 

If clothing is on fire

Remember these four key things: stop, drop, wrap and roll. Stop the casualty panicking or running – any movement or breeze will fan the flames

  • Drop the casualty to the ground and wrap them in a blanket, coat, or rug. Ensure they are made from inflammable fabrics such as wool
  • Roll the casualty along the ground until the flames have been smothered

 

Severe burns

If clothing has caught on fire it is more than likely that the burn will be severe. A severe burn is deep and doesn’t hurt as much as a minor one due to damaged nerve endings.

  • Start cooling the burn immediately under running water for at least 10 minutes. Use a shower or hose if the burns are large. Keep cooling the burn while waiting for professional help to arrive
  • Instruct a helper to dial 999 or 112 for an ambulance
  • Make the casualty as comfortable as possible, ideally lie them down
  • Continue to pour copious amounts of cold water over the burn until the pain is relieved.
  • Whilst cooling, remove any constricting items such as jewellery or clothing from the affected area unless they are stuck to the burn. Wear disposable gloves if they are available.
  • Cover the burn with a sterile dressing or clean, non-fluffy material to protect from infection. Kitchen film or a clean plastic bag make a good alternative dressing.